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GPOML.
Well, there it is. I work as a corporate librarian for a global bank. Along with a team of eight other researchers and librarians, we field reference requests from analysts and other bankers during the deal-making process. It’s mostly research on industries, companies, prices, historical trends, and about a million other things I didn’t know I didn’t know.
There’s usually work waiting for me at 8:30 when I arrive, and it doesn’t really ever stop—but we’ve got to go home at some point. While we do have a print reference collection, most of our work is conducted online through very expensive, super-slick databases that find company info, negative news, market data and whatever else we need. I spend time between about ten or so of those databases each day.
It’s certainly not the traditional work I was expecting for my first reference job, but it’s definitely a learning experience. It’s fast and challenging. It’s great to get on the phone with a panicky client and get to the bottom of what their looking for. It really is the same reference interview you might have in any school situation—except these homework assignments have quite a bit more at stake.
In the end, I’m helping patrons, growing as a researcher, and learning something new every single day. As a librarian, I can’t complain.

GPOML.

Well, there it is. I work as a corporate librarian for a global bank. Along with a team of eight other researchers and librarians, we field reference requests from analysts and other bankers during the deal-making process. It’s mostly research on industries, companies, prices, historical trends, and about a million other things I didn’t know I didn’t know.

There’s usually work waiting for me at 8:30 when I arrive, and it doesn’t really ever stop—but we’ve got to go home at some point. While we do have a print reference collection, most of our work is conducted online through very expensive, super-slick databases that find company info, negative news, market data and whatever else we need. I spend time between about ten or so of those databases each day.

It’s certainly not the traditional work I was expecting for my first reference job, but it’s definitely a learning experience. It’s fast and challenging. It’s great to get on the phone with a panicky client and get to the bottom of what their looking for. It really is the same reference interview you might have in any school situation—except these homework assignments have quite a bit more at stake.

In the end, I’m helping patrons, growing as a researcher, and learning something new every single day. As a librarian, I can’t complain.

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  1. thepinakes said: Welcome Katelyn!
  2. thelifeguardlibrarian posted this