wandering stacks
wrangling teenagers bankers nonprofits
on to the next library

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Maybe?

Maybe?

(via mrlapadite)

internet friends! follow me @katetkacik on instagram. 

are you there, too?

Woooo! Welcome to Chicago! :)

americanlibraryassoc:

ALA Midwinter 2015 registration and housing is NOW OPEN!

Midwinter will be in ALA’s home of Chicago, January 30-February 3.

Gif source

I’ve always loved Pendleton blankets and I would love some for my home but I suspected they might be problematic (especially giving their current placement in every place ‘hip’ and the blatantly racist ‘native’ trends in fashion relailers) so then I looked it up and learned some things specific to Pendleton. Any other good resources on this topic?

I’ve always loved Pendleton blankets and I would love some for my home but I suspected they might be problematic (especially giving their current placement in every place ‘hip’ and the blatantly racist ‘native’ trends in fashion relailers) so then I looked it up and learned some things specific to Pendleton. Any other good resources on this topic?

muspeccoll:

Have we found a real-life Mr. Collins in Special Collections?

Remember Mr. Collins in Pride and Prejudice - the creepy, pompous cousin of Mr. Bennett?  On a visit to the Bennett family, Mr. Collins attempts to read Fordyce’s Sermons to the young Bennett ladies, but the youngest, Lydia, interrupts him, and he is too offended to continue.

Special Collections’ copy of Fordyce’s Sermons was originally owned by an eighteenth-century clergyman who apparently thought quite highly of it.  He underlined and annotated both volumes, and on the front flyleaf, he wrote:

This Book ought to be read again and again by every young Lady in the Kingdom. I do not know any Praise too great, that can be given to the Author of it. 

You can find out more about our real-life Mr. Collins and see a gallery of his notes on the Scripta Manent blog.

image

- Kelli Hansen

Fordyce’s sermons lulzzzzz

the high cost of rugs is one of the great mysteries of the world amirite

zzzelda asked: five great novels you can think of, go.

the lowland

the lone ranger & tonto fistfight in heaven

happy potter & the goblet of fire

the once and future king

emma

(this was v random)

postcards-from-downtown asked: What was the switch across LIS sectors like? I believe you once were a youth services librarian, then a corporate librarian, and now a librarian at a non-profit. Did you find making the switch was easy? I'm feeling this pressure to know what LIS organization/environment I want to work in for at least a while, and its helpful to know how easy or difficult it would be to switch if I wanted to.

Chase that money, honey!

Nah, my abrupt changes were the result of lots of chance & some risk-taking. At the time I finished library school I also was experiencing some burnout in youth services and I’d outgrown my role in the organization I was with—it wasn’t a professional librarian position and I wasn’t getting the prodev support I needed. I took a chance on corporate work and it wound up being a great learning experience and resume booster as my first “professional librarian” role. Now I’m back in the non-profit work which has wound up being a great place to integrate the experiences I gain in the direct nonprofit program work + business sense I learned in the corporate world.

I’ve heard mixed reviews on how easy it is to move between types of libraries, or whatever, but I think early in your career anything is possible and you should make whatever moves you need to keep yourself employed & learning. Sometimes there just aren’t jobs available in the field you thought you’d be in. Library school creates a sense of that sort of pressure but it’s probably best to keep in mind that your practical experience is worth more than your coursework.

I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.

— L.M. Montgomery

On the desk!

Ask a librarian.

Question! Where do you learn the most current/appropriate language for diversity in race/sex/gender etc? →

kellymce:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

I’ve asked this before but only a couple resources were mentioned. They aren’t teaching us this stuff in library school (or at least not when I was in class) and so I’m wondering where librarians should be going to learn more. Language and vocabulary is always so key to generating dialogue and…

I’m thinking about how this question has to be a starting point. Language is important, but it always comes with a history and a context. It’s not just about knowing the right words, it’s about understanding where those words come from, and why they’ve been chosen. 

And of course, language is not monolithic. Not all people in any given group choose the same words (or recognize themselves as part of the same group). So, ask people what language they prefer. Or let them lead the conversation, and follow the language they’re using. 

GLAAD created an Ally’s Guide to Terminology (pdf), which is a good starting place, if sparse. But it frames the question in terms of language for allies to use, which I appreciate. Finding the “right” language isn’t about being an insider to the group. 

The LGBT Center at UW-Madison made this helpful gender pronouns guide (pdf). Cultural centers are a great place to see how language is being used in a community — go to a few events, listen to speakers, look at handouts and posters, and you’ll get the richness of language in context. 

For actually what people are using themselves,  heath-bear said zines, which I totally agree with, and lots of folks have been saying Tumblr. Follow blogs where people talk about the identities you want to learn about. There are also projects like the Trans Oral History Project, where you can hear people talking about their experiences. 

There’s a subtext in this question, too…that it is possible to use the “wrong” language, or the “right” words in the wrong way. I do this *all the time*. It’s part of communicating! The important thing is to keep talking: to make a genuine apology, listen, and learn. 

Lots of good stuff came through on this thread—also, yay tumblr. 

Question! Where do you learn the most current/appropriate language for diversity in race/sex/gender etc?

I’ve asked this before but only a couple resources were mentioned. They aren’t teaching us this stuff in library school (or at least not when I was in class) and so I’m wondering where librarians should be going to learn more. Language and vocabulary is always so key to generating dialogue and understanding. We very often might shy away from rich conversations because we don’t feel we have the right words to use in the right ways. 

Personally, I’ve learned more from tumblr and the colleagues I’ve met here than anywhere else. So what about you?

makeithappenday:

In case you haven’t heard, I’m running for ALA President. I need a social media campaign intern. Tumblarians only. Qualifications:
enthusiasm,
willingness to stick it out at least from now until May 1st but preferably from now until the end of my term when I win,
I can’t pay yet but when if I can, I will.
Reminder: tumblarians only need to apply. apply to: jp@porcaro.info

Tumblarians, JP wants YOU!

makeithappenday:

In case you haven’t heard, I’m running for ALA President. I need a social media campaign intern. Tumblarians only. Qualifications:

  • enthusiasm,
  • willingness to stick it out at least from now until May 1st but preferably from now until the end of my term when I win,
  • I can’t pay yet but when if I can, I will.

Reminder: tumblarians only need to apply. apply to: jp@porcaro.info

Tumblarians, JP wants YOU!

This weekend I really realized the extent to which this ridiculous place (now my home) can offer^ 

This weekend I really realized the extent to which this ridiculous place (now my home) can offer^ 

(Source: fiveseventeen, via madewell)

What are you reading?

I’m missing the fifth HP, must library ASAP.